N

eurons that fire together wire together.

Read the full publication written by Bernard J. Luskin, Ed.D., MFT on Psychology Today: ‚ÄćThe Media Psychology Effect

Bernard J. Luskin, Ed.D., MFT examined neuropsychology, media psychology, and learning psychology, as he focused on the importance of understanding the granular mechanics that enable the experiences that translate learning in the brain into personal experiences and memories registered in the mind.

Learning is a relatively permanent change in behavior as a result of experience. Understanding the physiology and the neuroscience of learning is a contribution of science. Psychology helps us grasp the true nature of personal development and transformation that results from every learning experience. Technology innovations continuously bring changes in teaching and learning.

These forces converge in the brain and in the mind during the experience of education and learning. Today, the drama surrounding COVID-19 is measurably accelerating such changes. This article offers a snapshot of the changes and new developments and translates them into a positive learning examination to share with researchers, teachers, students, and future leaders studying psychology.

Zooming into the future

ZOOMinars are becoming common in education as a teaching-learning tool. Their use in education has accelerated because of the unexpected and significant behavioral modifications COVID-19 now demands from our schools and colleges. To explore the newer approaches, I recently interviewed several experts including:

Read the full article here and discover more about what you know and what you still need to learn:

‚ÄćWhat you know and what you need to learn

The actual physical manifestations in learning occur through a neural network of dendrites and synapses in the brain, manifesting learning experiences that register in the mind. Each experience is comprised of a sensory response, decoded through the mind’s interpretation of symbols, and translated through language into understanding of the experience in the mind. Learning, therefore, is a relatively permanent and memorable change in behavior, as a result of experience.

Synesthesia, semiotics and semantics

The new virtual residency

Special thanks: Toni Luskin, Ph.D., editor; Adam Leipzig, CEO, MediaU.; Kumari Patricia Younce, MFA, Chair of Education, Goddard College; and Robert Wright, Ed.D., CEO & Michael Zwell, Ph.D., Chancellor, Wright Graduate University for the Realization of Human Potential for your insights.

References

  • A.P.A., American Psychological Association. (2020). Definition of Psychology (Public Information). Available from Google apa.org Retrieved June 26, 2020, from American Psychological Association
  • Cytowic, R.E. (1989). Synesthesia (1st ed. Vol. 1). Boston: MIT Press.
  • Dewey, J. (1910). How We Think (1st ed.). New York: D.C. Heath & Co.
  • Hebb, D.O. (1949). The Organization of Behavior, A Neuro-psychological Theory (1st ed.). New York ¬†Wiley.
  • Luskin, B.J. (2016). Explaining Media Psychology: A specialty that's time has come. [Media Psychology]. Psychology Today, 24(Luskin Learning Psychology).
  • Luskin, B.J. (2019). Synesthesia, Semiotics, Semantics and How We Learn. [Media Psychology]. Psychology Today, 46(Luskin Learning Psychology).

Read the full publication written by Bernard J. Luskin, Ed.D., MFT on Psychology Today: ‚ÄćThe Media Psychology Effect or check out Bernard J. Luskin's Page on The Healthcare¬†Hive

‚Äć

‚ÄćBernard J. Luskin, Ed.D., MFT examined neuropsychology, media psychology, and learning psychology, as he focused on the importance of understanding the granular mechanics that enable the experiences that translate learning in the brain into personal experiences and memories registered in the mind.

‚Äć

Posted 
Jun 29, 2020
 in 
Healthcare
 category

More from 

Healthcare

 category

View All